Next HIC film – Thursday 25th June

From Haringey Independent Cinema

On THURSDAY 25th June we will be showing the Pawel Pawlikowski film MY SUMMER OF LOVE – see below for review.

As ever we are showing the films at the West Green Learning Centre on West Green Road. Doors will open at 7pm and the night will start at 7.15pm. The film is in English but we are afraid that the film doesn’t have sub titles for our deaf friends. For those using dial-a-ride the night should end at 9pm. If you can’t make the film, then why not join us for a drink and chat in KK McCools afterwards.

For all further details like travel etc please check out our website at http://www.haringey.org.uk/hic/

See you Thursday, from all of us at Haringey Independent Cinema

my-summer-of-love-1————–

My Summer of Love

Pawel Pawlikowski | UK, 2004 | 86 mins | Cert. 15

Sandwiched between the brilliant asylum-seeker UK seaside drama, Last Resort (2000), and Ida (2013), his widely acclaimed Polish film about a 1960s nun excavating the buried remnants of her dead Jewish parents and the Holocaust, Pawlikowski’s My Summer of Love (2004) seems at first glance like somewhat lighter fare.

Freckled, working-class, sardonic teenager Mona (Natalie Press) meets the refined and confidently bourgeois public schoolgirl Tamsin (Emily Blunt) in their Yorkshire village during the summer holidays. The two girls rapidly become the proverbial “unlikely friends”, each seemingly fascinated by the other’s taste for honesty, transgression and an excitingly personal form of mysticism. For Mona, Tamsin provides not only glamour and acceptance from an unlikely, exalted and privileged source, but also temporary respite from the stress of living with her unpredictable, born-again-Christian brother Phil (Paddy Considine). Can something beautiful, unfettered and real finally be emerging in Mona’s unprepossessing existence?

My Summer of Love is a quite startling observation of a few intense weeks in the life of a young woman at an existential crossroads. It is difficult to think of a British film in recent memory that seems so effortlessly to combine beauty and genuinely breathtaking romance with such a devastating critique of sexualised inter-class relations and the horror of the potential for emotional vampirism at the heart of both summer and “love”.

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